Tom Ruble - EXIT New Options Real Estate



Posted by Tom Ruble on 10/5/2018

Ready to submit an offer on a home? Putting together a proposal that stands out in a home seller's eyes is key.

With the right home offer, you can improve your chances of securing your dream house without delay. Plus, dedicating time and resources to put together a home offer that works for both you and a home seller is sure to accelerate your journey from homebuyer to homeowner.

How can you improve your chances of submitting an offer that a home seller is sure to accept? Here are three tips to help a homebuyer submit a standout home offer.

1. Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage.

In many instances, a home offer may be contingent upon financing. And if a homebuyer has to secure financing after submitting a proposal, this individual could risk missing out on an opportunity to purchase his or her dream house.

Comparatively, a homebuyer who gets pre-approved for a mortgage will have the necessary financing in place when he or she submits an offer. As a result, this individual's offer may stand out from other proposals, particularly to a home seller who wants to speed up the home selling process.

2. Consider a Quick Home Inspection.

Don't ask the home seller for 15 or 30 days to conduct a home inspection. Instead, be ready to conduct a home inspection as soon as possible.

You may need only a few days to set up a home inspection. As such, if your offer includes a request for five or 10 days to complete a home assessment, it may stand out from others.

Also, if you find your dream home, you may want to consider purchasing the house "as is." Doing so may allow you to forgo negotiations between a homebuyer and home seller after a home inspection.

If you submit an "as is" home offer, you will be able to learn about the condition of a property before you buy it. However, after a home inspection, you will be unable to ask the home seller to complete repairs. At this point, if you find the house fails to meet your expectations, you can either walk away or buy the home in its current condition.

3. Add an Escalation Clause to Your Offer.

An escalation clause can help you compete against other homebuyers in a fierce real estate market. It enables you to increase your offer by a set amount over any other bids to a certain level. As a result, including an escalation clause in your home offer can help you avoid the risk of overpaying for a house and improve your chances of securing your dream residence at the same time.

Ask your real estate agent to include an escalation clause in your home offer. Your real estate agent can help you submit the perfect proposal, and ultimately, boost your chances of getting a "Yes" from a home seller.

Use the aforementioned tips, and you can bolster your chances of getting the right house at the right price.





Posted by Tom Ruble on 1/12/2018

Before you even start the home search, research is key. There are a few areas that you should look closely at in every home that youíre touring in order to make an informed decision about each property and your future in it. 


Check The Foundation


When youíre walking around the home, note creaky floors, cracks in the walls, and water drainage issues. Maybe you wonít even be able to see if the foundation has any cracks in it or not with your own two eyes. A certified home inspector will, however, be able to tell you what is happening on the property. Cracks in the foundation or major foundational damage can be incredibly costly to you as a homeowner. Youíre going to want to know about these issues ahead of time. 


Do Some Investigating


Taking a walk around your desired neighborhood can give you a lot of valuable information. You may be able to talk to neighbors who will give you a bit of information about a property. Even wandering around the neighborhood or attending yard sales can help you to see whatís going on, if you can see yourself living there, and if there are any major issues that you should be aware of. 


Be Likable


Sellers prefer to sell a home to a buyer who they like. if you see that you have something in common with the seller like the fact that youíre both veterans, you should send a letter along with your offer to let the seller know your connection. Itís also helpful to send an offer letter that lets the seller know how much you love the house and that you can see yourself living in the home. It never hurts to add a personal touch to a home offer.  


Keep Your Options Open


Just because a home doesnít consist of the modern decor you picture yourself living in, doesnít mean it canít be changed. If a home happens to be older with less present-day decor in it, be sure to keep an open mind as to the potential that the home has for you.


Make A Strategic Offer


We know that prices that end in 9 are a bit more attractive to the psyche than prices that end in a flat zero. If the asking price for a home is $310,000, you may be tempted to offer $320,000 to shell out the competition, but you may be better off offering an odd number like $312,000. Sometimes a small difference makes a big impact in the eyes of the buyer. Work with your realtor to see if a home youíre interested in has any other offers. Your agent can help you to find a good price point for your offer as well.





Posted by Tom Ruble on 2/10/2017

Imagine what it will be like when you discover your dream house. In all likelihood, this residence will meet all of your needs, along with your budget. However, it is important to note that the final price of your home is unlikely to be what you'll wind up paying for your new residence. There are many hidden home costs that you should consider before you finalize your home purchase, including: 1. Property Taxes Property taxes are a necessary evil. And even though every homebuyer would like to avoid them, these taxes must be paid consistently. Typically, property taxes are billed annually as a percentage of your assessed home's value. They may total thousands of dollars that you'll be responsible for paying every year, and as such, should be considered when you budget for your home purchase. Although you cannot avoid property taxes, you can plan for them. Homebuyers who budget accordingly, meanwhile, will be able to ensure that they can pay these taxes on time for the length of their mortgage. 2. Utilities You've decided to buy a home, but how do you plan to pay for electricity for your new residence? Or how do you intend to pay to heat and cool your home? Utilities are paramount, and the costs associated with utilities need to be evaluated during the homebuying process. Fortunately, working with an experienced real estate agent ensures you'll be better equipped to understand the utilities costs you may encounter when you buy a new residence. A real estate professional may be able to provide insights into how much utilities will cost based on the size of your home and your individual needs. That way, you'll be able to get a better idea about how much you'll need to save each month for electricity, heat and other utilities. 3. Home Repairs and Maintenance Even a brand new house will require repairs and maintenance over time. And even though every room in a home looks like it is in great shape now, the same may not hold true even a week, month or year from now. Putting aside money each month enables you to prepare for any minor or major home repair or maintenance projects that could arise. Furthermore, those who are in dire need of extensive home repairs may be able to apply for a home improvement loan to ensure they can get any home improvement projects done as soon as possible. Remember, planning ahead usually is a good idea, particularly for homebuyers. Budgeting for the unforeseen costs associated with buying and owning a home is important, and doing so will ensure you're prepared for any challenges that may come your way. Creating a budget and sticking to it can help you find a great home that won't force you to stretch beyond your means. Plus, those who develop a budget that includes potential hidden homebuying and homeownership costs can avoid the risk of falling into debt. Prepare for the hidden costs of buying a new residence, and you'll be able to maximize the value of your purchase.





Posted by Tom Ruble on 10/14/2016

Believe it or not, flood insurance may prove to be a valuable investment, even if your home is not located in a floodplain. Flood insurance covers physical damage to your residence or personal items due to floods. Thus, flood insurance offers added protection for your home and belongings, making it exceedingly valuable for homeowners. As a homebuyer, you may search for residences that are located outside of floodplains. But it is crucial to note that even a few inches of water can cause substantial property damage in a short period of time, and a residence remains at risk for flood damage even if it falls outside of a floodplain. So should you purchase flood insurance for your new home? Ultimately, there are many factors to consider, including: 1. Your Homeowners Insurance Policy Homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage. As such, you likely will need to purchase a flood insurance policy if you want to safeguard your residence against flood damage. Those who reside in designated flood zones will need flood insurance. Meanwhile, flood insurance usually represents a valuable option for those who live in inland areas or away from major rivers as well. If flooding occurs, you'll want to do everything possible to protect your home and assets. And with flood insurance, you'll be better equipped to safeguard your residence and belongings in the event of a flood. 2. Your Umbrella Policy With an umbrella policy, you are able to add liability coverage beyond what is offered in a standard homeowners insurance policy. An umbrella policy also offers protection against major claims and lawsuits to further safeguard your home and assets. Although you might have purchased an umbrella policy for extra liability insurance, this coverage does not apply to flood damage. As a result, you will need to prepare accordingly if you want to insure your home against floods. 3. The Coverage Provided by Flood Insurance Although flood insurance offers value for homeowners, it may fail to deliver full protection for your home and belongings. Federal flood insurance policies commonly provide coverage up to a set amount for your home and possessions. In the event that your residence or belongings are worth more than these totals, you'll only receive compensation from your insurer up to the federally mandated amount. When purchasing flood insurance, it is important to consider the value of your home and belongings. If you feel that flood insurance coverage fails to meet your needs, you may want to consider excess flood insurance to increase your total coverage. Furthermore, discussing your flood insurance options with a real estate agent may be a great idea. This professional will be able to tell you if your new home is in a floodplain and offer tips to ensure that you find a residence that satisfies all of your needs. Floods can cause serious damage quickly, but homeowners who are ready for the dangers posed by these natural disasters can plan appropriately. Therefore, homeowners may want to consider purchasing flood insurance, as this coverage will protect their homes and belongings if flood damage occurs.





Posted by Tom Ruble on 10/30/2015

Do you have a home buying strategy? Buying a home can be a risky and expensive proposition so you will want to make sure you have a plan. †In order to put a plan in place you will want to ask ask the following questions: How long do I plan to live here? You will need to consider how long you plan to live in your home to determine if it makes financial sense. Consider what changes you might make during that time frame. Will you be starting a family? Will elderly parents need to move in with you? You may need a larger home or need to find a community with better amenities for children, and that will increase the likelihood of you moving. How is the local market? All real estate is local. †Find out all you can about the neighborhoods you're considering. Look at the†inventory of homes, how have†properties gone up or down in value, and how much homes are selling for compared to the listing price. What is my financial stability? Consider factors like the stability of your job. Will you still be there in five years? What kind of future does your industry have? Does climbing up the career ladder mean you might have to move elsewhere to get ahead? Look at your current debts and income, not your future salary, to determine whether you can afford to buy.







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